WITHOUT URGENT, COORDINATED ACTION NOW, THE WORLD IS HEADED FOR A “POST-ANTIBIOTIC ERA” Common infections and minor injuries — treatable now for decades — will once again become potential killers.
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION ISSUES SPECIAL REPORTNews release 30 APRIL 2014 | WHO, Geneva The new WHO report provides the most comprehensive picture of antibiotic resistance to date, with data from 114 countries.
SUMMARYAntimicrobial resistance, including antibiotic resistance, is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. ________________________________________
Antibiotic resistance–when bacteria change so antibiotics no longer work to treat infections–is now a major threat to public health.

“Without urgent, coordinated action by many stakeholders, the world is headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Security. “Effective antibiotics have been one of the pillars allowing us to live longer, live healthier, and benefit from modern medicine. Unless we take significant actions to improve efforts to prevent infections and also change how we produce, prescribe and use antibiotics, the world will lose more and more of these global public health goods and the implications will be devastating.”

KEY FINDINGS OF THE REPORTThe report focuses on antibiotic resistance in seven different bacteria responsible for common, serious diseases such as bloodstream infections (sepsis), diarrhea, pneumonia, urinary tract infections and gonorrhea. The results are cause for high concern, documenting resistance to antibiotics, especially “last resort” antibiotics, in all regions of the world.
The treatment of last resort for life-threatening infections caused by a common intestinal bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae is carbapenem antibiotics.  Resistance to this has spread to all regions of the world. (K. pneumoniae is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, infections in newborns and intensive-care unit patients.) In some countries … carbapenem antibiotics do not work in more than half of people treated for K. pneumoniae infections.
Fluoroquinolones are one of the most widely used antibacterial medicines for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by E. coli– Resistance is now very widespread. In the 1980s, when these drugs were first introduced, resistance was virtually zero. Today, there are countries in many parts of the world where this treatment is now ineffective in more than half of patients.
More than 1 million people are infected with gonorrhea around the world every day. The last resort of treatment for gonorrhea is third generation cephalosporins, but treatment failure has been confirmed in Austria, Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden and the United Kingdom. 
Antibiotic resistance causes people to be sick for longer and increases the risk of death. For example, people with MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are estimated to be 64% more likely to die than people with a non-resistant form of the infection. Resistance also increases the cost of health care with lengthier stays in hospital and more intensive care required.
Read more about WHO’s first global report on antibiotic resistance … WITHOUT URGENT, COORDINATED ACTION NOW, THE WORLD IS HEADED FOR A “POST-ANTIBIOTIC ERA” Common infections and minor injuries — treatable now for decades — will once again become potential killers.
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION ISSUES SPECIAL REPORTNews release 30 APRIL 2014 | WHO, Geneva The new WHO report provides the most comprehensive picture of antibiotic resistance to date, with data from 114 countries.
SUMMARYAntimicrobial resistance, including antibiotic resistance, is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. ________________________________________
Antibiotic resistance–when bacteria change so antibiotics no longer work to treat infections–is now a major threat to public health.

“Without urgent, coordinated action by many stakeholders, the world is headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Security. “Effective antibiotics have been one of the pillars allowing us to live longer, live healthier, and benefit from modern medicine. Unless we take significant actions to improve efforts to prevent infections and also change how we produce, prescribe and use antibiotics, the world will lose more and more of these global public health goods and the implications will be devastating.”

KEY FINDINGS OF THE REPORTThe report focuses on antibiotic resistance in seven different bacteria responsible for common, serious diseases such as bloodstream infections (sepsis), diarrhea, pneumonia, urinary tract infections and gonorrhea. The results are cause for high concern, documenting resistance to antibiotics, especially “last resort” antibiotics, in all regions of the world.
The treatment of last resort for life-threatening infections caused by a common intestinal bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae is carbapenem antibiotics.  Resistance to this has spread to all regions of the world. (K. pneumoniae is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, infections in newborns and intensive-care unit patients.) In some countries … carbapenem antibiotics do not work in more than half of people treated for K. pneumoniae infections.
Fluoroquinolones are one of the most widely used antibacterial medicines for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by E. coli– Resistance is now very widespread. In the 1980s, when these drugs were first introduced, resistance was virtually zero. Today, there are countries in many parts of the world where this treatment is now ineffective in more than half of patients.
More than 1 million people are infected with gonorrhea around the world every day. The last resort of treatment for gonorrhea is third generation cephalosporins, but treatment failure has been confirmed in Austria, Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden and the United Kingdom. 
Antibiotic resistance causes people to be sick for longer and increases the risk of death. For example, people with MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are estimated to be 64% more likely to die than people with a non-resistant form of the infection. Resistance also increases the cost of health care with lengthier stays in hospital and more intensive care required.
Read more about WHO’s first global report on antibiotic resistance …

WITHOUT URGENT, COORDINATED ACTION NOW,
THE WORLD IS HEADED FOR A “POST-ANTIBIOTIC ERA” 
Common infections and minor injuries — treatable now for decades — will once again become potential killers.

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION ISSUES SPECIAL REPORT
News release 30 APRIL 2014 | WHO, Geneva 
The new WHO report provides the most comprehensive picture
of antibiotic resistance to date, with data from 114 countries.

SUMMARY
Antimicrobial resistance, including antibiotic resistance, is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. 
________________________________________

Antibiotic resistance–when bacteria change so antibiotics no longer work to treat infections–is now a major threat to public health.

“Without urgent, coordinated action by many stakeholders, the world is headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Security. “Effective antibiotics have been one of the pillars allowing us to live longer, live healthier, and benefit from modern medicine. Unless we take significant actions to improve efforts to prevent infections and also change how we produce, prescribe and use antibiotics, the world will lose more and more of these global public health goods and the implications will be devastating.”

KEY FINDINGS OF THE REPORT
The report focuses on antibiotic resistance in seven different bacteria responsible for common, serious diseases such as bloodstream infections (sepsis), diarrhea, pneumonia, urinary tract infections and gonorrhea. The results are cause for high concern, documenting resistance to antibiotics, especially “last resort” antibiotics, in all regions of the world.

  • The treatment of last resort for life-threatening infections caused by a common intestinal bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae is carbapenem antibiotics.  Resistance to this has spread to all regions of the world. (K. pneumoniae is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, infections in newborns and intensive-care unit patients.)
    In some countries … carbapenem antibiotics do not work in more than half of people treated for K. pneumoniae infections.
  • Fluoroquinolones are one of the most widely used antibacterial medicines for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by E. coli– Resistance is now very widespread.
    In the 1980s, when these drugs were first introduced, resistance was virtually zero. Today, there are countries in many parts of the world where this treatment is now ineffective in more than half of patients.
  • More than 1 million people are infected with gonorrhea around the world every day. The last resort of treatment for gonorrhea is third generation cephalosporins, but treatment failure has been confirmed in Austria, Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden and the United Kingdom. 
  • Antibiotic resistance causes people to be sick for longer and increases the risk of death. For example, people with MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are estimated to be 64% more likely to die than people with a non-resistant form of the infection. Resistance also increases the cost of health care with lengthier stays in hospital and more intensive care required.

Read more about WHO’s first global report on antibiotic resistance …

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