WARNING: Not Safe for Work … or for Your Exam in HematologyThe Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)
Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhaps they are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s).

Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.
[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals
[3] Blood parasites
[4] Fat cells
[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes
SOURCE: Codex 99 WARNING: Not Safe for Work … or for Your Exam in HematologyThe Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)
Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhaps they are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s).

Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.
[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals
[3] Blood parasites
[4] Fat cells
[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes
SOURCE: Codex 99 WARNING: Not Safe for Work … or for Your Exam in HematologyThe Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)
Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhaps they are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s).

Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.
[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals
[3] Blood parasites
[4] Fat cells
[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes
SOURCE: Codex 99 WARNING: Not Safe for Work … or for Your Exam in HematologyThe Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)
Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhaps they are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s).

Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.
[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals
[3] Blood parasites
[4] Fat cells
[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes
SOURCE: Codex 99 WARNING: Not Safe for Work … or for Your Exam in HematologyThe Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)
Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhaps they are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s).

Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.
[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals
[3] Blood parasites
[4] Fat cells
[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes
SOURCE: Codex 99

WARNING: Not Safe for Work … or for Your Exam in Hematology
The Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)

Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhaps they are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s).

Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.

[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals

[3] Blood parasites

[4] Fat cells

[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes

SOURCE: Codex 99

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