fight4future:

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On September 10th, just a few days before the FCC’s net neutrality comment deadline, internet users and tech companies will unite for the “Internet Slowdown” to show the world what’s at stake if we lose net neutrality, the “First Amendment of the Internet.”

We need everyone’s help right now to make this huge. Here’s what you can do right now to help make the Internet Slowdown go viral:

1. Forward this post to your friends and share the image with your social networks using the buttons above. We need people across the web to know about the slowdown so they can join on September 10th.

2. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook so we can reach you with urgent updates and action items as the big day approaches.

3. If you can, please chip in $10 (or more!) to help make the Internet Slowdown possible. We’re building tools that any website or organization can use to promote their own net neutrality action, because we care about the movement. But it’s not cheap! Help us sustain this critical work.

4. Contact your favorite websites, apps, and online services and ask them to join the Slowdown! Send them to this page: https://BattleForTheNet.com/sept10th

5. If you have your own website or app, put the Internet Slowdown widget on it. If you really want to be an Internet Defender, help out by using your own website to spread the word. It’s as easy as adding the widget/modal code found here:

https://BattleForTheNet.com/sept10th#modal

rhamphotheca:

What is this strange animal?

Is it a jellyfish? Nope, it’s a doliolid, closely related to sea squirts that you might see in a tide pool!

Pseudusa bostigrinus was discovered by MBARI researchers and was the first example of a carnivorous doliolid. Unlike other doliolids, its bell-shape is more like a jellyfish. This adaptation allows it to collect sinking particles by simply directing its large opening upward. The jellyfish-like velum allows it to trap zooplankton prey and to propel itself with considerable force and control.

You can read more about this animal here MBARI - Pseudusa.

(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

kqedscience:

Giant stinky Corpse Flower, blossoming
“The Huntington, a wonderful destination here in Los Angeles, has posted GIFs of the rare Corpse Flower blossoming. If you’re in Southern California, you gotta see it in person. The plant’s latin name, Amorphophallus titanum comes from Ancient Greek amorphos, “without form, misshapen” + phallos, “phallus”, and titan, “giant.”
(via BoingBoing)

kqedscience:

Giant stinky Corpse Flower, blossoming

The Huntington, a wonderful destination here in Los Angeles, has posted GIFs of the rare Corpse Flower blossoming. If you’re in Southern California, you gotta see it in person. The plant’s latin name, Amorphophallus titanum comes from Ancient Greek amorphos, “without form, misshapen” + phallos, “phallus”, and titan, “giant.”

(via BoingBoing)

florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.

How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus

Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

nysci:

Placental Vasculature of a transgenic mouse embryo.

Want to see more beautiful and significant life science images, captured through a light microscope? Then visit our Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Exhibit.
#Microscope #Science (at New York Hall of Science)

New Species of Venomous Jellies Discovered in Australia By Megan Gannon, News Editor, Live Science | August 13, 2014 

Two new species of jellyfish (Keesingia gigas and Malo bella) have been discovered off the coast of Western Australia. One is surprisingly large. The other is tiny. Both are extremely venomous.
These two newfound creatures are thought to pack painful stings that cause Irukandji syndrome, a constellation of symptoms that includes lower back pain, vomiting, difficulty breathing, cramps and spasms. Though Irukandji syndrome usually isn’t life threatening, two people who were stung in the Great Barrier Reef in 2002 died from severe Irukandji-related hypertension.
Research scientist Lisa-ann Gershwin, who is director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Services, described the new box jellyfish, or cubozoans, last month in the Records of the Western Australian Museum [available as a PDF].

Gershwin said that in all of the photos the jellyfish did not appear to have tentacles and that the specimen was also captured without them.

“Jellyfish always have tentacles … that’s how they catch their food,” she said. “The tentacles are where they concentrate their stinging cells. … Some of the people working with it through the years actually got stung by it and experienced rather distressing Irukandji syndrome.”

IMAGES:  [1] An example of the Keesingia gigas jellyfish. Photograph: John Totterdell/MIRG Australia. Via The Guardian  [2] Keesingia gigas in bloom of sea tomatoes, Crambione mastigophora. Image credit: John Totterdell / MIRG Australia.. Via Sci-News  [3] That’s not a plastic bag. That’s a newly described species of box jellyfish, Keesingia gigas. Image Credit: Lisa-ann Gershwin New Species of Venomous Jellies Discovered in Australia By Megan Gannon, News Editor, Live Science | August 13, 2014 

Two new species of jellyfish (Keesingia gigas and Malo bella) have been discovered off the coast of Western Australia. One is surprisingly large. The other is tiny. Both are extremely venomous.
These two newfound creatures are thought to pack painful stings that cause Irukandji syndrome, a constellation of symptoms that includes lower back pain, vomiting, difficulty breathing, cramps and spasms. Though Irukandji syndrome usually isn’t life threatening, two people who were stung in the Great Barrier Reef in 2002 died from severe Irukandji-related hypertension.
Research scientist Lisa-ann Gershwin, who is director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Services, described the new box jellyfish, or cubozoans, last month in the Records of the Western Australian Museum [available as a PDF].

Gershwin said that in all of the photos the jellyfish did not appear to have tentacles and that the specimen was also captured without them.

“Jellyfish always have tentacles … that’s how they catch their food,” she said. “The tentacles are where they concentrate their stinging cells. … Some of the people working with it through the years actually got stung by it and experienced rather distressing Irukandji syndrome.”

IMAGES:  [1] An example of the Keesingia gigas jellyfish. Photograph: John Totterdell/MIRG Australia. Via The Guardian  [2] Keesingia gigas in bloom of sea tomatoes, Crambione mastigophora. Image credit: John Totterdell / MIRG Australia.. Via Sci-News  [3] That’s not a plastic bag. That’s a newly described species of box jellyfish, Keesingia gigas. Image Credit: Lisa-ann Gershwin

New Species of Venomous Jellies Discovered in Australia
By Megan Gannon, News Editor, Live Science | August 13, 2014 

Two new species of jellyfish (Keesingia gigas and Malo bella) have been discovered off the coast of Western Australia. One is surprisingly large. The other is tiny. Both are extremely venomous.

These two newfound creatures are thought to pack painful stings that cause Irukandji syndrome, a constellation of symptoms that includes lower back pain, vomiting, difficulty breathing, cramps and spasms. Though Irukandji syndrome usually isn’t life threatening, two people who were stung in the Great Barrier Reef in 2002 died from severe Irukandji-related hypertension.

Research scientist Lisa-ann Gershwin, who is director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Services, described the new box jellyfish, or cubozoans, last month in the Records of the Western Australian Museum [available as a PDF].

Gershwin said that in all of the photos the jellyfish did not appear to have tentacles and that the specimen was also captured without them.

“Jellyfish always have tentacles … that’s how they catch their food,” she said. “The tentacles are where they concentrate their stinging cells. … Some of the people working with it through the years actually got stung by it and experienced rather distressing Irukandji syndrome.”

IMAGES:  [1] An example of the Keesingia gigas jellyfish. Photograph: John Totterdell/MIRG Australia. Via The Guardian  [2] Keesingia gigas in bloom of sea tomatoes, Crambione mastigophora. Image credit: John Totterdell / MIRG Australia.. Via Sci-News  [3] That’s not a plastic bag. That’s a newly described species of box jellyfish, Keesingia gigasImage Credit: Lisa-ann Gershwin